Colorado News: Doubling of Colorado’s RPS

Colorado House Bill 1281, which doubles Colorado’s Renewable Portfolio standard (RPS) (as well as the solar set-aside) passed the state Senate on Friday, and is certain to be signed into law by state lawmakers.

Here’s how the new requirements stack up against the old Amendment 37 requirements (passed by a popular vote in 2004.)

rps.GIF
Not exactly a “doubling,” but is there a better way to describe it?

“A37″ are the old requirements for investor owned utilities (affectionately known as IOUs,) “HB 1281″ are the new requirements for IOUs, and “Co-ops” are the new requirements for Rural Electric Co-ops (which previously had an opt-out, although a few decided not to opt out.)
The opt-out contained a provision that each Co-op’s members (i.e. customers) vote to opt out, which most of them proceeded to do (one exception is Holy Cross, which chose not to opt out, however, this has led to some contention with Xcel as to whether or not their existing power purchase agreement with Xcel included the renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with Xcel’s generation of electricity from renewables… since both utilities use these RECs to meet their requirements.)

While the opt-out elections all seem fair and democratic, that is before you realize that all the information most members were getting was coming from their co-op’s management. This is fine with progressive co-ops like Delta-Montrose and Holy Cross, but when it comes to troglodytes such as the management of the Intermountain Rural Electric Association (IREA), it’s a little more Orwellian.

In the recent House and Senate hearings, IREA was arguing for another opt-out from HB 1281, arguing that IREA’s members had voted against it in the first election, and that it would force IREA to raise rates (despite the fact that the bill specifically states that rural co-ops only have to meet its requirements if they can do so with less than a 1% rate increase (the more stringent requirements for IOUs can be met with an up to 2% rate increase.) In some ways IREA’s failure to get their opt-out into HB 1281 was due to their own maneuverings. In response to IREA’s funding of a global warming skeptic this summer led many of IREA’s members to wonder what else Stan Lewandowski was doing with their money that they did not know about. They founded IREA Voices to try to get a greater say in how their customer-owned utility is run. (If you know anyone who lives in IREA territory (just south of the metro Denver area, make sure they know to vote for the IREA Voices candidate in their district. (Mike Kempe, Mike Daniels, or Jake Meffley, if one appears on the ballot that came with their last IREA bill.) If you don’t live in thier districts, they are funding their campaigns out of their own pocket, plus any donations. Help out if you can!

It’s ironic that co-ops, which supposedly exist to serve the best interests of their members (as opposed to shareholders) are often the laggards (and in IREA’s case, even deniers) of the environmental effects of our reliance on coal for electricity. I believe that Stan Lewandowski believes he is doing the right thing by trying to keep rates down, and damn everything else, but in the end, the farmers he feels he is serving will be the ones who suffer some of the worst effects of global warming.

Anyway, it looks like momentum is finally on the side of those of us that realize the magnitude of the disaster facing us, but time is also of the essence, and the faster groups like IREA Voices can catalyze change, the better for all of us.

So let’s cheer Colorado’s doubling of the Renewable Portfolio Standard, but let that one victory inspire us for the struggles ahead. We’re a long way from the time when we can declare victory and go home.

1 Comment

  1. [...] has a good chance of increasing the requirement for electricity from renewable sources for the second time since I’ve been blogging here. When I moved to Colorado in 2005, the state had recently passed the first renewable energy [...]

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