Archive for Home Improvement

Desperation, but Good Desperation in Local Housing Market

Want to roll a Prius into your mortgage?

The fallout from the subprime mess has come to my neighborhood. This ad appeared in the community paper put out by the developer:

desperation.jpg

Now, you can get a free Prius with the standard solar you get on Harvard Communities’ (massively overpriced) Architect Collection homes. From an economic perspective, it makes a lot of sense for the builder to install solar; it costs them a lot less to do it than people who have to retrofit. But what’s the logic in having the builder fill your garage?

See the solar panels

These developers (especially the high end ones- these’ll set you back $800K) will do anything to avoid having to lower their price. Personally, I think they’re smart, people are more interested in buying things for status than practicality.

The world is crazy, but I shouldn’t complain. It may just get some people out of SUVs and into Hybrids.

But it does bother me that the most important energy efficiency things Harvard Communities is doing are quite cheap (good insulation, sealing the house well, using efficienct appliances) but it’s the splashy expensive stuff like a free car and PV that gets all the press. It makes people think that you have to spend a lot of money to be energy efficient. You don’t, but it’s a belief that is liable to keep coming back to haunt us for a long time.

Comments off

National (and Colorado) Tour of Solar Homes, October 6

Note: This post was originally for the 2006 Tour. The 2007 Tour of Solar Homes will be on October 6, 2007. See the original post after the break.

———————Info about 2007 Tour of Solar homes————————

Colorado Solar Tour link
Colorado Tour of Solar Home Flyer
For Southwest Colorado, there’s some info on the SWCRES website.
For Fort Collins area tour, see NCRES Website
For other states, go to the National Solar Tour link

———————Info about 2006 Tour————————
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (1)

To PV, or not to PV, that is the question.

Are you thinking about installing a photovoltaic (PV) system on your house?  Do you think to yourself, “It will be great to have my meter run backwards and have the electric company pay me for a change”?  “And I’ll be doing something to save our environment.”

The statement above that really bothers me is the part about doing something to save our environment.  My problem with it is the number of resources required: you’re going to have to give something up to buy that PV system, and the thing you are giving up could easily do a whole heck of a lot more good for the environment.  

Suppose you buy a PV system for $20,000 (rebates may halve the price of this, but you’ll see that that won’t make much difference in my argument.)  There’s a lot of argument over the precise numbers, but that system will produce 3,000 kWh (price $9/watt installed, 15% capacity factor) to 4,500 kWh a year ($7 per watt, 18% capacity factor.)   For electricity prices at a balmy Hawaiian $.24 per kWh, that system will then pay for itself (before maintenance) in a minimum of 18.5 years, and generate 83 MWh over that time, or around 150 MWh over the life of the system (30 years.)

Before anyone starts arguing about rising energy prices, let’s compare that PV system to something else we can do with the same money, at the same electricity prices. Suppose we take that same $20,000 and invest it in a 1 year CD at 5%.  After a year, we will get $1,000 in interest, which we will use to buy 500 25watt compact fluorescent light bulbs (in bulk) at $2 each.  We give these away to people who are currently using 100w incandescents.  Over the next several years, those CFLs will save a total of 300,000 kWh (8000h bulb life x 75w per hour saved x 500 bulbs). 

After only a year, we still have $20,000 so we can still buy a PV system if we want to (and take advantage of any rebates we missed out on the year before), we have avoided someone using over 300 MWh of electricity, which is about twice as much as the PV system will generate in its rated 30 year life (and don’t forget the cost of maintenance.)  Plus, most of the energy savings from the CFLs will happen over the next 8 years, rather than the 30 years it will take the PV system to generate half as much.  Most importantly, we have our initial investment of $20,000 back after one year, even though we are giving the CFLs away, while it will take over 18 years to get our money back from the PV system. 

 Because I believe in putting my money where my mouth is, anyone who mails me a receipt for the purchase of CFLs, I will PayPal them up to $5 or $2 per bulb, whichever is less (no more than once per person.)  Household LED bulbs also qualify for the same rebate.  I’ve uploaded a form to fill out, and plan to keep track of the number of bulbs, and the Negawatts generated on my website (as soon as my web guys get to it.)   This will be good for up to $1000 of total payments, or until December 31, 2006 (postmark), whichever comes first.  

Please note: I have withdrawn this offer as of 7/16/07. I have given out about $1,500 worth of rebates for over 750 CFLs, saving approximately 44 kWh per day.

For comparison, a PV system to offset the same amount of power on a daily basis would have to be over 7.5 kW, and would cost about $67,500, or 45 times as much (although it would last about 6 times as long as the CFLs, and it might only cost 20 times as much after rebates.)

Comments (8)

« Newer Posts