Archive for Alternative Transport

New Light Rail Stations May Not Increase Transit Ridership

A report (pdf) by the Kitty and Michael Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University found that new rail stations and transit-oriented development often fail to increase transit ridership.

New stations can sometimes lead to gentrification that prices out renters and low-income households. Since such households are core users of transit services, the new station may have the perverse effect of actually causing local ridership to decrease.

The study did not look at system-wide effects of such stations; I would expect new stations to lead to an increase in system-wide ridership over time, since the displaced renters and low-income households will most likely continue using transit in their new neighborhood, and many of the new higher-income residents will use transit for some trips that they would not have before they lived in a neighborhood with easily accessible transit.

Here are some highlights from the report compiled by Andrew Nusca at SmartPlanet:

* For 64 percent of the neighborhoods around the new rail stations in the study (that’s 27 of 42 total), population grew more quickly than the rest of the metro area.
* 55 percent of those neighborhoods showed a “dramatic” increase in housing production.
* 62 percent of those neighborhoods showed a faster increase in owner-occupied units than the rest of the metro area.
* 50 percent of those neighborhoods showed an increase in the proportion of non-Hispanic white households relative to the rest of the metro area. (The other half showed no change or a decrease.)
* 62 percent of those neighborhoods showed an increase in median household income; 60 percent showed a boost in the proportion of households with incomes of more than $100,000.
* Perhaps most tellingly, 74 percent of the neighborhoods showed rents that increased faster than the rest of the metro area. A full 88 percent had a relative boost in median housing values, too.
* In 40 percent of the new transit neighborhoods, public transit use declined relative to the rest of the metro area.
* In 71 percent of the neighborhoods, ownership of a vehicle increased; in 57 percent, ownership of two or more cars increased.

The report was published with a “Toolkit for Equitable Neighborhood Change in Transit Rich Neighborhoods” with several sensible suggestions for moderating the adverse effects (mainly on renters and low income households) of a new rail transit station, mostly related to planning and zoning.

Of course, a transit agency primarily concerned about increasing ridership and equity at the same time might simply consider adding more and better bus service in a neighborhood, something which can be done at much lower cost than adding a new rail station. In my mind, the ideal option would be to do some of both, with new rail stations complemented by frequent bus routes that bring riders to the station from surrounding areas.

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Will 2010 Mark the Shift from the Backward-Looking and Unaffordable Electric Cars to Forward-Thinking Smart Mobility?

Cleantech Group Chairman Nicholas Parker Thinks So

Tom Konrad, Ph.D.

I’ve long argued that the future of mobility in the peak oil era will center on alternative modes of transport, not alternative fuels for the same old car infrastructure.  Electric cars are probably the car of the future, but the cost of batteries and escalating cost of oil will mean that the number of electric vehicles is likely to remain low, while how often we use conventional vehicles will decline as fuel prices rise.

In his annual clean technology predictions for 2010, Cleantech Group Chairman Nicholas Parker prophesies,

Electric cars take the back seat to smart mobility

In 2009, electric vehicles and hybrids eclipsed fuel cell vehicles as the undeniable new center of gravity of the auto industry. Virtually every car company in Asia, Europe and North America announced ambitious clean car strategies, and many brought new models to market, in addition to startups funded by venture capitalists.

In 2010, clean cars will form part of a broader shift to smart mobility. Smart mobility will quickly permeate beyond simply the transport sector, and will be integrated into the new energy paradigm and influence the design of urban systems, even shipping ports. Look increasingly in 2010 for eco-city designs based on concepts such as “new urbanism.” Leading governments around the world will rethink tax systems, fiscal incentives and budgets to encourage greener forms of work and transport based on smart mobility concepts (SNCF, the French state-owned rail operator, set up a fund in 2009 specifically to invest in e-mobility.)

I think he’s being too optimistic on the time frame, but I sincerely hope he is right.   If he is, it will be good for my investments.  Three of my forthcoming Ten Clean Energy Stocks for 2010, to be published on AltEnergyStocks.com in this coming week are currently profitable companies focused on alternative forms of transport.

Two of his other predictions should also be good for my stock pick, if they come to pass.  Mr. Parker sees energy efficiency (three picks) eclipsing solar (no picks), and growing interest in waste-to-energy (one pick.)  You can see the rest of his predictions here.

 

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