MIT Study: IGCC may not be better for Carbon Sequestration

There’s a new study out from MIT which questions the received wisdom that IGCC or “Clean Coal” plants “will make it easier and cheaper to capture carbon dioxide, compared with collecting it from the smokestacks of conventional power plants.” The study calls for “large-scale demonstration programs that would, for the first time, capture carbon dioxide from coal plants, transport it, and store it at a large scale.”

While I disagree with the assertion that “coal… will continue to be a major source of electricity,” the reason I think that coal will not make the cut when the true costs of the associated emissions and environmental damage from mining are taken into account, the reason I believe this is that the costs of carbon capture and sequestration are likely to be much higher in reality than they are in theory, especially when we are attempting to sequester a “volume of compressed carbon dioxide … similar in scale to the amount of oil consumed in the United States,” and so we will no longer be able to use it only in places where it is actually useful, such as in enchanced oil recovery.

For this reason, I totally concur with the conclusion that we need to start doing large scale CO2 sequestration now, so we can decide if there is any hope of it working before we throw tons more money at cola plants (either conventional pulverized or IGCC) in the hope that some time in the future we’ll figure out some economic way to shove the carbon that we should have left underground in the first place back underground.

On the bright side, it looks like American Electric Power (NYSE: AEP) is trying large scale carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). I hope they can get it to work at reasonable cost… if CCS could be made to work cheaply, we could start capturing CO2 from biomass power plants, and have carbon-negative electricity.

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