That “Free” set-top box isn’t free

Here’s an article from Reuters about the hidden costs of set top boxes… up to $76 a year in electricity bills for a cable set-top box.

This is one of those opportunities for energy conservation that I really like to push: you not only can save energy, but money as well, and it does not require sacrificing quality of life.  CFLs and Passive Solar architecture also come to mind… there are so many energy saving opportunities that pay for themselves, it breaks my heart.

Most consumers don’t see the money or electricity they’re wasting here, and so they don’t know that they need to be more discriminating.  These hidden cost provide a great opportunity for useful government regulation.  Requiring that A/V equipment have a sleep mode that uses 1 watt instead of 30 watts would only add marginally to the cost of most equipment (See this great Economist in-depth article on the subject from this spring)  Oops- it’s only available to subscribers.   Some highlights:

 STRANGE though it seems, a typical microwave oven consumes more electricity powering its digital clock than it does heating food. For while heatictq237.gifng food requires more than 100 times as much power as running the clock, most microwave ovens stand idle—in “standby” mode—more than 99% of the time. And they are not alone: many other devices, such as televisions, DVD players, stereos and computers also spend much of their lives in standby mode, collectively consuming a huge amount of energy. Moves are being made around the world to reduce this unnecessary power consumption, called “standby power”.

In 1998 … standby power accounted for approximately 5% of total residential electricity consumption in America, “adding up to more than $3 billion in annual energy costs”…. results, published in 2000, revealed that standby power accounted for as much as 10% of household power-consumption in some cases.

…In 1999 the International Energy Agency, based in Paris, adopted Dr Meier’s proposed “one-watt” standard as a target for standby consumption. In 2000 Australia became the only country to adopt this standard nationally, in the form of a voluntary scheme that began in 2002. The aim is for most new products to meet the one-watt standard by 2012.

In addition to these various voluntary schemes, there have been some mandatory measures. Perhaps surprisingly, one of them was introduced by President George Bush, as a result of the California energy crisis of 2001. That year, Mr Bush issued Executive Order 13221, which states that every government agency, “when it purchases commercially available, off-the-shelf products that use external standby power devices, or that contain an internal standby power function, shall purchase products that use no more than one watt in their standby power consuming mode.” Given that Mr Bush is not renowned for his environmental credentials, this came as quite a surprise to those in the industry.

That law does not apply to consumers, and there are a ton of energy hog products out there.

What can you do?  Buy Energy Star  rated products.   I also have a tester called a Kill-a-Watt from P3, to see which of the gadgets I already have are energy hogs.  Some nonprofits have these available for loan, and if you live in Denver, I’ll loan you mine.  The Center for Resource Conservation in Boulder has a nice little calculator you can use with it, too.

If you find you already have products that use a lot of power on standby (and you probably will,) consider plugging them into a power strip, and turning them off that way.  That’s not always an option, though.  I found that my VCR/DVD combo uses 30 watts all the time, and it would lose it’s programming if I turned it off with a power strip.   I’m thinking about replacement.

I also think this is a great argument for laptops over desktop computers… laptops are designed to conserve power, because they have to make the battery last… most desktops are not.  If you want a big screen and a keyboard, you can always use a docking station. 

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