Archive for November, 2011

Map of Hybrid/Electric vehicle sales across the US

NPR is doing a series looking at automakers’ push to meet the new CAFE standards. Included is this map of hybrid/electric vehicle sales across the US by market:

http://api.tiles.mapbox.com/v2/npr.basemap-world,npr.hybrid-sales/mm/zoompan,tooltips,legend,share.html#4/36.65000000000001/-96.96999999999997

I thought it would be interesting to compare it to gasoline prices across the US. Here’s one from Gasbuddy.

I’m having trouble getting the frames to work, so you need to open two separate windows to view them side by side.

The correlation looks near perfect with the exception of the most rural parts of the mountain west and (MT, UT) and norther Great Plains (ND,SD). These states buy fewer hybrids than you would expect given their gas prices. My guess is that they see it as unmanly: at least that was the case with one of my sister’s ex-boyfriends, a farmer from Montana living in Wyoming.

The flip side is the desert southwest: Tucson and Albuquerque buy more hybrids than I would expect based solely on gas prices. Perhaps the fragile ecosystem makes them more environmentally conscious?

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Risk Aversion and Pricing Climate Risk

I felt the “Editor’s Corner” article in the most recent Financial Analysts Journal (Sept/Oct 2011) “Pricing Climate Change Risk Appropriately” does an excellent job explaining why the possibility of extreme climate scenarios justifies a considerably higher price for carbon than would be warranted under the most likely or average scenario: Humans are risk averse.

Equities… have low prices (and high expected returns) because their cash flows are discounted by society at high rates. The reason has to do with the anti-insurance aspect of equities: Their cash flows are highest in good states of nature whereby the value placed on the cash flows is low. In contrast, efforts to mitigate climate change by pricing carbon emissions will be most valuable to society if climate change turns out to have catastrophic consequences for society‚Äôs well-being. Because of this insurance aspect, society should be willing to pay higher prices for climate change mitigation.

FAJ Executive Editor Robert Litterman goes on to explain the mechanics behind carbon pricing models and their flaws, as well as why equity analysts are uniquely qualified to do these assessments.

I’ve long thought that financial market theory is uniquely applicable to understanding climate and the measures needed to mitigate climate change. what I don’t understand is why I hear so few analysts talking about it, so it was very refreshing to come across this article applying a deep understanding of economic pricing theory to what the greatest challenge the world will confront in the 21st century.

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