Greenwashing at KB Home

Poor attic insulation melts snow
I took this picture on February 7, 2010, in Denver’s Stapleton New Urbanist development in Denver.  Most of the houses in Stapleton are EnergyStar qualified, but this picture tells a story about some that aren’t.  The blue house in the background was built in 2009 by Wonderland Homes.  The tan house in the foreground is a KB Home built in 2008. 

Note how the still-falling snow is melting on the north-facing roof of the tan KB Home, but not on the similarly oriented roof of the blue Wonderland home.  Also note that clear lines of unmelted snow where the roof trusses add an extra layer of insulation between the attic and the roof.  This is a clear sign that the KB Home (NYSE:KBH) lacks sufficient attic insulation, and enough heat is escaping from inside the house to the attic to melt the snow on the roof as quickly as it is falling.  Nor was it just this one house… all the houses I saw that were built by KB showed signs of snow melting on the roof, while all the houses I saw built by other builders (New Town Builders, Wonderland, and McStain) showed no signs of melting.  Many were built in 2007, before either of the homes in the photo.

I was shocked.  The Stapleton website proudly proclaims “Since 2006, every Stapleton builder had been an EnergyStar partner.” I’d taken this to mean that every home built in Stapleton since 2006 was an EnergyStar home… an assumption I’m sure Forest City (NYSE:FCE-A) and KB Home would love us to assume.  Instead, I have to assume it means that KB builds some EnergyStar homes, somewhere.

KB’s web page for their Coach Series homes in Stapleton displays the EnergyStar logo in two locations.  One logo appears with the text “An EnergyStar qualified neighborhood” (emphasis mine) and the other is in a box that says “Save 30-45% on your utility bills with a new KB home compared to a home built as recently as the 1990s.”  The implication is clearly that the Coach series homes are EnergyStar homes, but my photo shows clear evidence that they are not.  (Ironically, the New Town and Wonderland websites display the EnergyStar logo much less prominently.)

From page 19 of KB Home’s2009 Sustainability Report [pdf]: We have a long history of building ENERGY STAR qualified homes. The percentage of our homes that are built to this exacting standard has grown from 1% of our home deliveries in 2001, the year we began working with ENERGY STAR for Homes, to 37% in 2008. One-third of our divisions built every one of their new homes to this standard in 2008, and only one of our divisions did not build at least some ENERGY STAR qualified homes.

I’m underwhelmed.  First, EnergyStar is not an “exacting standard.”  An EnergyStar home must save at least 15% of the energy used by a standard code-built home.  According to a 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory study [pdf p.14], “for a 2,000-gsf house built to achieve 30% energy savings relative to standard practice, a homeowner can save $512 a year more on his or her energy bills than the extra cost of the slightly larger mortgage.”  In other words, this “exacting standard” leaves a lot of money on the table, even when the additional cost (and mortgage) is accounted for.

Further, 37% EnergyStar qualified is better than your average homebuilder… but your average homebuilder does not plaster their website with the EnergyStar logo. 

I wonder if the owner of the tan house (or any of the many other KB Homes I saw with melting snow on the roofs) think they are living in EnergyStar homes?

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6 Comments

  1. Thanks for pointing out what I’ve been saying for the last few years. Mt so called energy efficient KB Home is just the opposite, the sprayed in insulation in the attic goes from zero to 8 inches uneven all over the place. The air conditioner heat pump blew out every year for four years turns out KB had wired it up to the wrong voltages. The main dampers to control the zones were never connected to any electricity no wires were live. KB’s energy star looks more like a black hole. Most likely we over paid way more for energy with a KB Home since the dampers were closed, the house is full of mold and hundreds of defects. No wonder the x CEO of KB Home is on trial February 23rd 2010 for stock fraud/manipulation. He played with stocks so he could walk away with an additional $150,000,000.00 million more instead of building a good product – that’s the real crime here. The current CEO Jeffery Mezger is dumping stocks as fast as possible right now. KB would argue that the black shingles in your image heated up more and melted the snow. That home is filled with toxic fumes since there are no air hawks to let the toxins out – just like mine. Do a follow up story on Karatz, his profits and the legacy of homes KB Builds – where only the profits for he privileged few exist KB Board members.

    • Tom said

      “KB would argue that the black shingles in your image heated up more and melted the snow.”

      I don’t think KB is that dumb. As I mentioned in the article, the roof shown is north facing, and if you click on the picture for the Hi-res version, you’ll see that it’s snowing rather heavily. There isn’t any sun on that roof.

  2. gary said

    HEYKB.. NEED A GOOD JOB SUPER???????

  3. Holly2463 said

    This is good idea. Keep posting like this. Keep it up.

    http://www.linkedin.com/groups/KB-Homes-4004751

  4. KB Home did not insulate our new home’s attic properly to code either. Our attic was supposed to have a minimum of 13″ blown in insulation and it only had about 6-7″ with NO insulation on the other side. This was supposed to be an Energy Star home. KB Home is now going around bragging how green it is when it can’t even insulate an attic properly! You are exactly right, that’s a good way to tell in colder climates how well an attic is insulated by how much heat is escaping which melts snow.

  5. Everyone should run from KB Home as their homes in my opinion are absolute garbage. The homebuilder is starting to get a lot of bad press in Florida and the story is about to go national. Homes have water intrusion and mold and they are crumbling after being just a few years old. So far there have been over 12 communities that have come forward.

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